Excellence in Library Research

Karen Axelrod, AULA President Tex Boggs, Kent Grant, 
Lisa Lepore, Amy Smith, and AULA Provost Luis Pedraja.

Karen Axelrod, AULA President Tex Boggs, Kent Grant, 
Lisa Lepore, Amy Smith, and AULA Provost Luis Pedraja.

Two graduate students and one undergraduate student were presented with Library Research Awards at a ceremony on June 3, 2014, held appropriately in the new 4th floor library.

“The 2014 Library Research Awards honor these students, how they skillfully used the work of others to support works of their own. Scholarship in many ways represents the best of us, an acknowledgment of what is possible and what we are capable of,” said Director of Library Services, Lisa Lepore.

For her award-winning paper “The Impact of Neonatal Chronic Pain and Illness on Child Development,” MA in Psychology student Karen Axelrod studied D.W. Winnicott’s 1960 work “The theory of the parent-infant relationship,” alongside current research from a bounty of peer-review journals. She adeptly understood the work and seamlessly integrated the findings into her paper.

Kirsten Imani Kasai, MFA in Creative Writing, was recognized for her paper, “How Feminist Utopian Literature Can Serve as a Model for Creating Workable Futures,” which explored the possibility of a feminist utopia, understanding feminism to be an inclusive, heightened manner of being that allows for communions across differences.

The award for a BA student was presented to, Kent Grant, Liberal Studies, for his paper, “Quiescent: HIV/AIDS,” an investigation into the HIV epidemic. His paper focused on the homophobic and consequently tepid initial response to AIDS, as well as the way in which both pharmaceutical companies and the government made profit a priority over access.

This marks the second year for the Library Research Awards,which were generously funded by Amy Smith and her husband, Robert Simon. Smith, a former librarian herself, believes that a vital library is essential to the intellectual life and welfare of a university and wanted to promote the lifelong skills of library research and critical thinking. Each student received a prize of $800.00.

Lepore concluded the ceremony with what she described as a final thought and perhaps even a plea. “Let’s, through civic and political and artistic and intellectual action, defend our right to know and support places like libraries and archives that preserve and share our collective knowledge. Let’s all be wake-up artists.”